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  #11  
Old 11-06-2015, 04:55 PM
s_stabeler s_stabeler is offline
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Originally Posted by Food Lady View Post
No, Jesus wasn't nice and tolerant of sin. But having a medical condition isn't sin. In Jesus' day people asked what the afflicted did wrong in order to suffer this way. That was a false belief that Jesus refuted (John 9:1-3). In fact, He healed the man.
yes and no. Jesus DID say "whoever of you without sin should cast the first stone" when (IIRC) some people wanted to stone a woman for committing a sin. More or less, I think Jesus was of the opinion that Man should not judge if someone has committed sin. ( so, for example, you can punish someone for murdering someone else, but you can't punish them for the sin of murder)
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  #12  
Old 11-06-2015, 09:03 PM
Gravekeeper Gravekeeper is offline
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Its particularly idiotic given that regardless of where any given religion started basically all major religions preach universal compassion in the modern era. Especially the Modern American Christian(tm).

Usually, the more intolerent/assholish a religious person is the louder they yell about their message. Something I believe Jesus actually spoke quite a bit about. ;p
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  #13  
Old 11-06-2015, 09:55 PM
Tama Tama is offline
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I believe Jesus would call such a person a Pharisee?
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  #14  
Old 11-06-2015, 10:32 PM
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Hyena Dandy Hyena Dandy is offline
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I think he'd probably call a Pharisee a Pharisee. :P
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  #15  
Old 11-07-2015, 02:49 AM
Food Lady Food Lady is offline
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Originally Posted by Rageaholic View Post
Reminds me off a time when my cousin's grandma in law said (within earshot of her) that she needed to "pull herself up by the bootstraps". I should mention that said cousin was suffering from bipolar disorder.

And that Matt Walsh guy, fuck him. He's the poster boy for smug, holier than thou Christians who feels he has the right and duty to tell others how to live. He is one of the biggest twats on the internet.
I see that bootstraps view as typical of the religious right (not all people in that group, but it's what they're known for). The trouble is that they are seen as representative of christianity when the view isn't entirely biblical. Sure, there are things we can do to help ourselves, but we're still imperfect non-omnipotent humans. The poor and afflicted will always exist. Jesus said that. And yet, they are debased often. And that Matt guy annoys me sometimes. I had to stop following my friend on fb because she references so much of his stuff. I rarely agree with him.
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  #16  
Old 11-07-2015, 01:16 PM
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jedimaster91 jedimaster91 is offline
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Originally Posted by s_stabeler View Post
yes and no. Jesus DID say "whoever of you without sin should cast the first stone" when (IIRC) some people wanted to stone a woman for committing a sin.
It's been awhile since I've read that particular story, but IIRC, the sin was adultery and the situation was basically a trap. In those days, adultery was punishable by death, so if He had said to spare the woman, he wasn't following the law. But if He said to stone her, clearly He's not the loving, forgiving, benevolent Son of God He claims to be. So He took a third option and reminded the crowd that they all have sinned. The average person really isn't meant to make those kinds of judgements on other people. By all means, judge the actions. We all have to do that just to get through life. But don't judge the person. That's not your place.
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  #17  
Old 11-09-2015, 03:26 PM
Shangri-laschild Shangri-laschild is offline
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Originally Posted by jedimaster91 View Post
It's been awhile since I've read that particular story, but IIRC, the sin was adultery and the situation was basically a trap. In those days, adultery was punishable by death, so if He had said to spare the woman, he wasn't following the law. But if He said to stone her, clearly He's not the loving, forgiving, benevolent Son of God He claims to be. So He took a third option and reminded the crowd that they all have sinned. The average person really isn't meant to make those kinds of judgements on other people. By all means, judge the actions. We all have to do that just to get through life. But don't judge the person. That's not your place.
Exactly. My niece isn't allowed to lecture or punish her brother. She has to let an adult do that because it's not her place. In this instance, we're all the kids and God would be the adult. But instead the mentality of "being a dick for jesus" keeps happening and it drives me up the wall.
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Is religion really the issue?
  #18  
Old 01-20-2016, 01:22 PM
Mental_Mouse Mental_Mouse is offline
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Lightbulb Is religion really the issue?

It seems to me that people tend to use religion to justify whatever they seek to do. But where some folks use it to justify their urges to sadism, control, selfishness, vengance, and so on, there are others who use it to justify a different set of impulses: compassion, goodwill, generosity, forgiveness, and the like.

The variations in people's personalities and moral sets seem to come from a mixture of biological predisposition (formal "temperament") and experience (especially "upbringing", that is childhood experience). People use religion as a pretext to declare that whatever they feel and do isn't "just them", but is or should be "everyone" -- and they use the structures of their religion to coerce or train other people to act as they do.

So, going back to the OP title, it's not a matter of a given religion lacking compassion, but of folks who already lack compassion, using the tools of religion to justify themselves and punish others for showing compassion.
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