Go Back   Fratching! > General > Clash of Cultures

View Poll Results: Should Fans Nag Sig & John About Tobacco Use?
Yes (Why?) 0 0%
No (Why?) 4 36.36%
Don't Know 0 0%
Don't Care 0 0%
Neutral 0 0%
Who The Hell Are These People & Why Do We Care? 7 63.64%
Voters: 11. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

  #11  
Old 03-14-2016, 04:50 PM
kamn kamn is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
Posts: 125
Default

Late to the thread, but my 2c.

It is the doctors job to give days to your life. It is your job to give life to your days.

A doctor has no right to dictate how someone must live. NOONE has any right to tell anyone how they must live (under normal circumstances. Abuse, crime, minors, and so forth all have their own set of rules). Nagging them to change their habits is doing just that, dictating (polite as it may be) how someone lives. And any doctor that tells anyone else what their patient is suffering from, should lose their licence. Doctor/patient confidentiality isn't something to make light of.
Reply With Quote

  #12  
Old 03-14-2016, 08:16 PM
TheHuckster TheHuckster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,461
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kamn View Post
A doctor has no right to dictate how someone must live.
Part of doctors' jobs is to consult patients on how to be healthier. A while back I was diagnosed with high cholesterol. My doctor told me how to control it with diet and exercise and prescribed a pill to me. I found it hard to adopt those new habits, and after 6 months when I came back and the doctor found no improvements, he asked what I was struggling with, and we had a frank discussion about it. Nothing wrong with that.

If a patient defies a doctor's orders, it's their prerogative, but it's the doctors prerogative to suggest changes in one's lifestyle and habits to improve their health. It's not about dictating. Doctor's orders aren't bound by any law (unless it's something like 'do not operate a car') so to say their suggestions or even nagging is some kind of dictating is nonsense. Part of a doctor's role is to be a consultant. I go to the doctor because I want to, first, make sure I'm in good health and, second, find ways to improve my health.
Reply With Quote

  #13  
Old 03-14-2016, 10:17 PM
s_stabeler s_stabeler is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 2,157
Default

not what kamn said, TheHuckster. what I think kamn was trying to say is that a doctor has no right to try to FORCE someone to change something they are doing. Sig Hansen's doctor can advise him that if he doesn't give up smoking, he will end up like Phil Harris. Sig Hansen's doctor CANNOT tell fans of the show to nag Sig about smoking. Why? for two reasons. One is that it is a breach of patient/doctor confidentiality- while no legally privileged information has been given out- I think- when someone talk to their doctor, they are relying on said doctor not speaking to all and sundry about what thye might say. Second is that it's ultimately Sig's decision.
Reply With Quote

  #14  
Old 03-14-2016, 11:15 PM
TheHuckster TheHuckster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,461
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by s_stabeler View Post
not what kamn said, TheHuckster. what I think kamn was trying to say is that a doctor has no right to try to FORCE someone to change something they are doing.
He was specifically saying that "noone has any right to tell anyone how they must live" and goes on to condemn doctors who nag. While I would agree doctors who needlessly beat a dead horse about someone's habits is often counterproductive, it is part of their job to advise them about how to lead a healthy life.

Nobody has ever said anything about forcing someone to change. How the hell does a doctor FORCE that, anyway? Does the doc stand by the patients swiping out any cigarette out of their hand? Even this incident isn't about force. Sig can still do whatever he wants, it's just the doctor's asshole approach to it exacerbated the issue.

I agree doctors should never disclose any information (regardless of its content) about their patients, though.
Reply With Quote

  #15  
Old 03-19-2016, 05:07 PM
BlaqueKatt BlaqueKatt is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,539
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHuckster View Post
Doctor's orders aren't bound by any law (unless it's something like 'do not operate a car') so to say their suggestions or even nagging is some kind of dictating is nonsense.
So you'd be fine with your doctor taking out an ad in the paper saying "the huckster has high cholesterol, if you see him eating anything high in fat be sure to remind him of his high cholesterol, loudly, in public, it's for his health"

Because that's what this "doctor" is doing.
Reply With Quote

  #16  
Old 03-19-2016, 08:07 PM
TheHuckster TheHuckster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,461
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlaqueKatt View Post
So you'd be fine with your doctor taking out an ad in the paper saying "the huckster has high cholesterol, if you see him eating anything high in fat be sure to remind him of his high cholesterol, loudly, in public, it's for his health"

Because that's what this "doctor" is doing.
That's not what my post was about, and if your read a later post, you'll see that I do not support this doctor's actions. I was specifically addressing kamn's post that a doctor shouldn't tell someone how they should live. I agree that if they go beyond that and start breaching confidentiality and being a jerk about it, that's not only wrong, but illegal.
Reply With Quote

  #17  
Old 03-21-2016, 03:14 PM
Shangri-laschild Shangri-laschild is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 362
Default

You're missing the distinction that was made though. There is a difference between advising and nagging. If every time I went to my doctor's office, the doctor demanded to know why I hadn't lost weight yet, that is no longer recommending or counseling. A doctor can make recommendations, even strong ones, but they can't dictate how someone lives and trying to do so whether it involves harassing a patient about it themselves or getting other to do it, is out of line.

Last edited by Shangri-laschild; 03-21-2016 at 03:18 PM.
Reply With Quote

  #18  
Old 03-22-2016, 02:16 PM
kamn kamn is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
Posts: 125
Default

Sorry for being absent. And yes, I was a bit miffed at the time, so my wording isn't as proper as I'd like it to be. My apologies for that confusion.

Yes, a doctor can give advice. It is what we expect of them. Sometimes, I wish they could give out MORE advice than they are currently allowed to. However, when they cross over into nagging, they are actively trying to influence their patient's decision, instead of simply informing them, which is what I consider to be an immoral (as well as illegal) thing for a doctor to do.

TheHuckster, I believe that the issue we might have is the "nagging". A person that is nagging to someone else, is actively trying to influence that person. It isn't commanding them, true, but it is a subtler way to make them do things. And anything that makes another person do something is a form of control over them, dictation on how they must/should live.
Now, someone trying to influence another person may have their best interest at heart. But without a complete understanding, both objectively and subjectively, of a person, they can do more damage than good. A fat person could suffer a heart attack if you make them exercise, a smoker could harm himself or others if he can't relieve stress in any other way (other than smoking), a rich man might fall into depression after quitting his job... A complete understanding means both objective and subjective, understanding what the persons body, as well as mind, will do, if something is given or taken away, if he or she is taught a new method of living or even doing a small thing in their life. Humanity, while getting a better understanding every day, does not have a complete understanding. The closest any one person can come, is on/about themself. That is why, even under the best of circumstances, a person should not be forced/influenced to do something, barring a few exceptions (minors, diminished reasoning capacity, illegal activity...). That is why I find it wrong for any doctor to be as forward as to nag someone, to do something. Again, advice is fine, but influence isn't.
Reply With Quote

  #19  
Old 03-22-2016, 04:35 PM
TheHuckster TheHuckster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,461
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kamn View Post
Sorry for being absent. And yes, I was a bit miffed at the time, so my wording isn't as proper as I'd like it to be. My apologies for that confusion.

Yes, a doctor can give advice. It is what we expect of them. Sometimes, I wish they could give out MORE advice than they are currently allowed to. However, when they cross over into nagging, they are actively trying to influence their patient's decision, instead of simply informing them, which is what I consider to be an immoral (as well as illegal) thing for a doctor to do.
I think we need to define what you believe is nagging. If I go to the doctor once a year, or even every 6 months, and the doctor asks if I had made any changes to my habits as he advised before, and reminds me to do so, then that's not nagging to me. If the doctor, on the other hand, is calling me every week to remind me to join Planet Fitness and ditch the Frito's, then yes that's nagging. I wouldn't consider it illegal unless the doctor repeatedly ignores my requests to leave me alone and crossed the line into harassment.

I would probably leave my doctor for someone more reasonable before it really reached that point anyway, though.
Reply With Quote

  #20  
Old 03-28-2016, 12:40 AM
CriminalMindsRocks CriminalMindsRocks is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 28
Default

whoa...uh ok...first of all, is was NOT Sig's dr. that took to FB to rally fans to get Sig/John to quit, it was one of the camera guys who has served as producer aboard the NW at some point during the 13 yrs this show has been airing..

Also, 2 seasons ago, Edgar Hansen, Sig's younger brother & the NW's deckboss has had an ongoing problem with his back/neck that was causing shooting pains that were getting gradually worse so Sig took him back to Dutch so he could go to the clinic to get seen too. While he was at the clinic the cameras WERE allowed to film.

When Phil had his stroke, that was the first thing he told the camera guy when he came out of his coma, that he wanted the guys to continue to film, REGARDLESS OF WHAT THE OUTCOME WAS

Another captain, Scott Campbell Jr. allowed the same when he had surgery on his back

I could go on, but I think ya'll get the point....These guys are stubborn, they don't listen to NO etc & in my interpretation of Decker's post was that seeing as they are going to include the footage when the season starts (since the cameras WERE ROLLING when Sig collapsed) & that Sig & John both know how beloved they/the show is the WORLD OVER, that Sig & John would be more apt to listen to their fans who DO NOT want to see Phil Harris 2.0 situation..Hell, Decker may well have been one of the producers on the boat when all this went down & if that is so, then the doctor didn't violate anything because more likely Decker went with Sig when Sig was airlifted to Anchorage

And for the record, it was Sig's daughter Mandy who told us Sig had survived the 'widowmaker' not the dr. so there again, NOTHING was violated...permission was likely granted by Sig's wife & so Disco. can say whatever the hell they please
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 03:21 PM.


vBulletin skins developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.