Go Back   Fratching! > General > Clash of Cultures

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

History from other perspectives
  #1  
Old 11-14-2012, 12:22 AM
violiav violiav is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 196
Default History from other perspectives

I think i might stumble over this thought.
I've often wondered what history is like in other places. Rather, the different ways certain events are viewed. Obviously, here in America everything is America-centric. That's normal. I'm curious at to how other countries treat that same era.
How is the American revolution discussed in English classroom, for example?
Reply With Quote

  #2  
Old 11-14-2012, 01:07 AM
Greenday's Avatar
Greenday Greenday is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,925
Default

My friends in Florida called the American Civil War "The War of Northern Aggression". I laughed pretty hard at that one.
__________________
Violence has resolved more conflicts than anything else. The contrary opinion that violence doesn't solve anything is merely wishful thinking at its worst. - Starship Troopers
Reply With Quote

  #3  
Old 11-14-2012, 01:55 AM
Nekojin Nekojin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,228
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenday View Post
My friends in Florida called the American Civil War "The War of Northern Aggression". I laughed pretty hard at that one.
That's actually extremely common among Southerners who have had family in the region for generations. Even if their family wasn't actually in the South during the Revolutionary War.
Reply With Quote

  #4  
Old 11-14-2012, 02:41 AM
wolfie wolfie is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 937
Default

Back when I was a kid, I remember a TV commercial from Time Life Books (can't recall if it was for books or VHS tapes) for "an unbiased account of the Second World War". My reaction to that was "Cool - a documentary produced by Martians".

After all, WW2 was such a big thing that NOBODY from an industrial country on Earth would be completely unbiased.
Reply With Quote

  #5  
Old 11-14-2012, 03:43 AM
Greenday's Avatar
Greenday Greenday is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,925
Default

One of the things I've always wanted to do was travel to a few different European countries and take history classes there. I'd love to see WII from Japan's view, or Germany's, or Italy's. The American revolution from England. The War of 1812 from Canada.
__________________
Violence has resolved more conflicts than anything else. The contrary opinion that violence doesn't solve anything is merely wishful thinking at its worst. - Starship Troopers
Reply With Quote

  #6  
Old 11-14-2012, 04:21 AM
bara bara is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 908
Default

Bias in history lessons is a bane in any society. The old saying 'History is written by the winners' isnt always accurate. The way the Native Americans were treated was monstrous and was skipped over way to easily when I was in school.

A more worldly view of past events is necessary more and more as we become more connected.
Reply With Quote

  #7  
Old 11-14-2012, 04:21 AM
AmbrosiaWriter's Avatar
AmbrosiaWriter AmbrosiaWriter is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 433
Default

I actually took a class that was based in just that. It was called World Civilizations (it was a two semester class) and it started waaaay back during the earliest civilizations and then moved forward into most contemporary times. For all the places that we studied during different times we always had accounts and such from many different places about the same thing.

It was pretty awesome. Very eye opening.

Same concept happened when I took an Anthropology course. I do suggest people try to find a way to look into it, it's VERY enlightening.
Reply With Quote

  #8  
Old 11-14-2012, 06:08 AM
Rapscallion's Avatar
Rapscallion Rapscallion is offline
Some balding guy
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,715
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by violiav View Post
How is the American revolution discussed in English classroom, for example?
I think it worth noting that the UK in various forms has been around for quite a bit longer than the US. When I was in school, the revolution you refer to wasn't on the menu. I remember (poorly) doing the Normans and Saxons before realising I didn't enjoy history and dropping it like a sack of burning dog shit. Classical studies (ancient Rome and Greece etc) was far more entertaining.

See, for us it's not compulsory to learn about one particular incident in a very long timeline. I'm sure it's covered, but we only have a so much time and so much to cover, so we get a syllabus of what areas we're going to be tested on for each year in school, rather than a mandatory.

It might be the middle ages, the tudors, the normans and saxons, WW1 and 2, the victorians, the napoleonic era and so forth. We've got more history than we can conveniently learn.

I can see why it's treated with such reverence in the US as it's where you came from and well documented, but our past is a far more lengthy and murky affair. No clean formation of the nation.

Rapscallion
__________________
Proud to be a W.A.N.K.E.R. - Womanless And No Kids - Exciting Rubbing!
Reclaiming words is fun!
Reply With Quote

  #9  
Old 11-14-2012, 07:26 AM
Nekojin Nekojin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,228
Default

Well, see, the British Empire was created when a Norman warrior tried to pick up on a Saxon barmaid...

No, wait, that's the origin of the English language, not the British Empire. Never mind.
Reply With Quote

  #10  
Old 11-14-2012, 10:54 AM
Librarian Librarian is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 3
Default

Speaking from a not english, but european classroom here: we never discussed the american civil war. From dinosaurs, cavemen, egypt, greece, normans vs saxons, the romans and their influence on the world, middle ages and some of the great rulers and countries of europe in the years 1200-1800. Then on to the late 1800's and all the movements in europe to stop child labour, to world war one, interbellum and world war 2 quite extensive, but it stopped there. In history we also never learned about vietnam or korea. But we would spend quite a bit of time learning about Karolingers and Merovingers, the working class man in the late 19th century, and the origin of how countries came to be (for example from Prussia to Germany etc)

Clarify: This was over the course of 6 school-years from ages 12 to 18. (i wouldn't know the term or equivalent in english/american/... of those years, here its called "middleschool")
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 09:20 AM.


vBulletin skins developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.