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  #51  
Old 07-27-2015, 07:31 PM
Estil Estil is offline
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Yeah one of my favorite professors Mark Summers (NO, not the Double Dare host!!) at UK (University of KY, not United Kingdom) kinda had a pet peeve of essay answers that were just "here's what happened in this war, here's what happened in that war..." and in one exam I remember threatened to give a big fat zippola for an answer like that. Oh yeah and he also happened to be featured on "The Presidents" mini-series from the History Channel too

Oh yeah and regarding Hayes, you think the 2000 election was controversial, that was NOTHING compared to what the 1876 one was like. Not to mention John Quincy Adams got to be President not only despite not having the most popular votes, but was second in the Electoral College too. See Andrew Jackson got the most Electoral votes but both then and now that's not enough. You must get a majority or more than half to get to be the big guy.

Last edited by Estil; 07-27-2015 at 07:35 PM.
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  #52  
Old 07-27-2015, 08:13 PM
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Andara Bledin Andara Bledin is offline
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Here's a fun question about US history: What happened to the natives?

I mean, the ones Columbus and his cronies didn't hunt down like animals for sport while stealing their riches, that is... >_>
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  #53  
Old 07-27-2015, 09:41 PM
Kheldarson Kheldarson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andara Bledin View Post
Here's a fun question about US history: What happened to the natives?

I mean, the ones Columbus and his cronies didn't hunt down like animals for sport while stealing their riches, that is... >_>
Do you mean in general? As in a why the hell were Europeans even able to colonize here general?

Plague happened. Some was early contact *points to South America* but NA tribes got hit with something nasty before Europe showed up.
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  #54  
Old 07-28-2015, 04:01 AM
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HYHYBT HYHYBT is offline
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We certainly got a lot about Reconstruction the year we had Georgia history, but even other years I remember learning about wildly swinging economic cycles, the Populist party, Sherman Anti-Trust Act, that sort of thing from that period. There was other stuff, but I don't now remember what. But that it didn't stick doesn't mean it wasn't covered, and that some things did means those years weren't skipped over. Oh, inventions! This was also the time period when electric lights, the telephone, etc. were changing life. That's history and was taught as such. Easy to forget that history isn't just politics.
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  #55  
Old 07-28-2015, 05:37 AM
Tama Tama is offline
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Shows what kind of history class I took. When I read:

Quote:
history isn't just politics
My very first thought was, "It's not?" I know better but it was my first reaction.

Last edited by Tama; 07-28-2015 at 05:40 AM.
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  #56  
Old 07-28-2015, 02:37 PM
TheHuckster TheHuckster is offline
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Yes, we did cover the robber barons and subsequent anti-trust laws afterwards, too.

I still feel as though the period between 1860 and 1910 were mostly glossed over, though. We talked a little about reconstruction, but a lot of the story was left out. For instance, obviously after the emancipation proclamation was made and the 13th amendment was passed, it didn't magically end all slavery. The government had to enforce it, and there was a lot of resistance for decades after slavery officially ended, which had to be met with intervention by police.

I don't recall much discussion about that part of reconstruction in grade school, and I feel as though that's an important topic to cover. History teachers brought up the 13th Amendment as if it was some magic pill that ended all slavery in 1865, and in 1866 people just started rebuilding the south in peace and unity. Again, it wasn't until college that they covered some of the aspects of reconstruction and how it wasn't really such a peaceful time, albeit it was far more peaceful than the war that came before it.

Last edited by TheHuckster; 08-04-2015 at 03:40 PM. Reason: Typo made me off by a whole century
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  #57  
Old 01-22-2016, 06:39 AM
Mental_Mouse Mental_Mouse is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andara Bledin View Post
Here's a fun question about US history: What happened to the natives?

I mean, the ones Columbus and his cronies didn't hunt down like animals for sport while stealing their riches, that is... >_>
Well, IIRC Columbus didn't come anywhere near as far north as the 13 original colonies. The big thing was that the various Spanish explorers had introduced smallpox and other new diseases to the continent, which spread like wildfire with something like a 90% fatality rate. So, the later settlers further north could easily spread into a nearly-depopulated area, which seemed miraculously bountiful... because those "forests" were recently-abandoned orchards and game parks.
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  #58  
Old 01-23-2016, 10:14 PM
cindybubbles cindybubbles is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenday View Post
One of the things I've always wanted to do was travel to a few different European countries and take history classes there. I'd love to see WII from Japan's view, or Germany's, or Italy's. The American revolution from England. The War of 1812 from Canada.
I learned about the War of 1812 in high school. I think it's what promoted the development of a strong Canadian identity, because of our victories over the invading US forces. It prevented Canada from becoming the 51st US state, at least, officially, I think. I forgot all about it after high school, so please pardon my ignorance.

Maybe Gravekeeper can help out with this one?
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  #59  
Old 01-27-2016, 10:46 PM
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Rapscallion Rapscallion is offline
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Something occurred to me today about this.

A guy I work with and I were talking and the subject of the Turing film with Benedict Pumpkinpatch came up. Said youth (early twenties maybe?) was unaware of how Alan Turing was treated immediately after the war for his homosexuality. He was absolutely stunned.

In his own words, this happened within the lifetime of his grandparents, so I pointed out (feeling old) that it was within the lifetime of my parents. It's not just different countries, it's different times, and what has been covered up that is slowly coming to light is astounding.

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